Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Damage of Clear Cutting on Remaining Trees

Clearing a piece of land–even for a purpose such as building a house–isn’t just about the loss of the living trees that are cut down, although that is very sad.

Surrounding trees may be damaged physically in the process if extreme care is not take.

But, surrounding trees WILL BE damaged no matter what is done because the loss of their companions affects them in many ways.

  • Physiologically.  In the tree’s world, one trunk is not a tree.  All the trees operate together as a community, sharing nutrients and information about their ecosystem so that their individual functions can operate in a healthy way.
  • Environmentally.  In the tree’s world, chemical and other signals are exchanged that give all trees information about conditions such as nutrient availability, insect populations, and temperature changes. When the environment goes through a radical change–such as the removal of other trees–the remaining trees’ signal exchange capacity is reduced or ended.
  • Energetically.  In the tree’s world, trees share something like a song. They emit a vibration or pulse in their bio-energy fields.  With that they maintain ecosystem viability in a way similar to a whole orchestra playing beautiful music on beat and in tune.

Symphony Silenced!

Imagine an orchestra playing a beautiful piece of music.  Then–right in the middle of it–imagine that the whole string section is swept away!  What happens to the rest of the instruments?  Is there still a symphony?

Much of that kind of harmony is lost when a significant number of trees are removed from a piece of land.  Remaining trees may not have sufficient health or cohesiveness in community to support one another.  If they cannot stay related in physiological, environmental, and energetic community, they will sicken and may die.

What can be done?

Conventional tree-care methods and approaches do not recognize this delicate, bioenergy exchange and orchestra-like capacity of trees in groups. It may take years for the affects of the clear cutting on remaining trees to show up as decline and death.  So, conventional tree-care approaches do not make the connection back to the clear cutting.  They can do little to help the trees.

Holistic and bio-energy approaches such as BioBalancing® and Tree Whispering® address not only the INNER physiological aspects of trees but also their bio-energy interactions with other trees and with their ecosystems.

When all the trees on a property are operating in sync–like an orchestra–all can be healthy.

Simple non-linear approaches are available that anyone can do to give their trees a boost.  Click here to go to the freely-available Healing Whispers at  TreeWhispering.com.

 

Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Ropes and Ties Cut Off Circulation in Living Beings

This tree is losing circulation.  Ropes and ties damage the bark but, more importantly, they cut into the delicate vascular tissue which is JUST UNDER the bark.

People have veins and arteries.  Trees have xylem and phloem tissue.  Same thing, really.  They are all tubes in which fluids flow to keep the living Being alive.

If you put a very tight rope or tourniquet on your arm or leg, you stop the blood flow.  You may save your life but you might lose that arm or leg.

If you put a rope or tie on a tree, you stop the flow of fluids, water, and nutrients from moving around.  The whole tree may die.  It’s true that occasionally a tree will grow around the rope or tie, but more usually, it dies.

REMOVE TIES OR ROPES IMMEDIATELY.

 

 

 

Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Failing to Water Hurts Trees of Any Age

This is a young tree. It may have been transplanted into this spot earlier this year.  Watering was needed but the property caretakers failed to water regularly or enough and so the tree is in decline.

If you didn’t drink water for even a day, you would become dehydrated; the cells of your body would lose some of their ability to take up water. When you would get water again, your cells might not re-hydrate right away.

Shock occurs in people from dehydration and something similar to shock occurs for trees when they are dehydrated; when they wilt.  Parts and inner functions are compromised with dehydration so they don’t just recover immediately.

Older trees can suffer dehydration, too.

They have more more “body” mass that needs to receive water and carry food and nutrients to all of their parts.  Their leaf surface areas transpire–or lose–water in large amounts.  So they need a steady stream of water out to their drip line.

Yes, give deep, slow, and long watering to big old trees in summer heat and/or drought.

 

 

 

Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Buried with Soil–FILL KILLS–Don’t Be a Landscape CopyCat

The tree says, “You put extra soil and plants over my base. Maybe you think it looks pretty but it will set back my growth for years. I might even die from this.”

Dr. Jim Conroy, The Tree Whisperer®, explains:

People often copy what others have done—even if it was wrong to begin with. Don’t be a landscape copycat.

If the tree dies, then there is the expense of cutting it down and the possible expense of re-planting.

Roots—especially the big important roots at a tree’s base—can ROT if they are covered with materials such as rocks or heavy mulch. What can you do?

  • If this happened recently–say, this year–you can remove it.  Remove the rocks and dig off the extra soil. Gently smooth it to the same level as the lawn.  DO NOT add mulch.  You may put down a very thin layer of ORGANIC LEAF COMPOST, not more than 1/2 an inch.
  • If you don’t know when this happened, remove the rocks and scrape away the extra soil.  BUT DO NOT SCRAPE away roots.  The tree may have tried to grow surface roots into the soil in order to recover health and breathe.  You may put down a very thin layer of ORGANIC LEAF COMPOST, not more than 1/2 an inch.
  • After removing the fill, leave it alone.  DO NOT fertilize as that will put more stress on the tree!
  • Water the tree regularly when it is hot and dry in summer.

You might try something unconventional to help the tree.

  • Give the tree lots of loving attention.  Say nice things to it from your heart.  Tell it that it is a beautiful living Being.
  • You might sing to it.
  • You might whisper to it with tree Healing Whispers.  Use the free download at this page at our sister site: TreeWhispering.com
  • Thank the tree for its life and for its gifts to you of oxygen and shade. It is a living Being.
Be a TREE PROTECTOR!  Do what is best for the tree. Think like a tree. Come from the tree’s point of view.

Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Weighed Down to the Drip Line; What Can You Do?

 

This tree is crying out in pain, “You are killing me! I will die under this build-up of soil and mulch at my base. I will die because of all the rocks and stones out to my drip line. I’m choking and can’t breathe!! Air can’t get through all this covering and its hot. The weight of all these things is too heavy for my roots.”

Dr. Jim Conroy, The Tree Whisperer®, explains:

There may have been some practical reason why the homeowners would put all these materials under the drip line of this poor tree. But, they are killing this tree.  It is a living Being!!!

The materials add weight over the roots and suffocate them.

Roots can ROT and DIE if they are covered with so many materials.

What can you do???

  • If this happened recently–say, this year–you can remove it.  Rake away the mulch. Rake up every stone and gently smooth the soil to the same level as the lawn.  DO NOT add mulch.  You may put down a very thin layer of ORGANIC LEAF COMPOST, not more than 1/2 an inch.
  • If you don’t know when this happened, remove the mulch, rocks and try to scrape away the extra soil.  BUT DO NOT SCRAPE away roots.  The tree may have tried to grow surface roots into the soil in order to recover health and breathe.  You may put down a very thin layer of ORGANIC LEAF COMPOST, not more than 1/2 an inch.
  • After removing the materials, leave it alone.  DO NOT fertilize as that will put more stress on the tree!
  • Water the tree regularly when it is hot and dry in summer.

You might try something unconventional to help the tree.

  • Give the tree lots of loving attention.  Say nice things to it from your heart.
  • You might sing to it.
  • You might whisper to it with tree Healing Whispers.  Use the free download at this page at our sister site: TreeWhispering.com
  • Thank the tree for its life and for its gifts to you of oxygen and shade.
Be a TREE PROTECTOR!  Do what is best for the tree. Think like a tree. Come from the tree’s point of view.

Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Suffocated with Stones; What Can You Do?

The tree says, “AHRRGGGHHH!  I’m choking under these heavy stones. Please don’t cover my roots with a stone layer. Air can’t get through them. You might think they are pretty, but they hurt me. I might die from this because I can’t breathe and they are hot in summer.”

Dr. Jim Conroy, The Tree Whisperer®, explains:

Some people think that covering the base of a tree with something gives a pretty look. However, this is potentially deadly to the tree.  Would you want stones filling your mouth?? Probably not.

Heavy materials on under the base of the tree can suffocate its delicate roots. Roots need air as much as they need soil and water. Trees pull up water and nutrients from the soil through their roots. But, roots can ROT and DIE if they are covered with materials such as stones or heavy mulch. And, they get hot in summer.

What can you do???

  • If this happened recently–say, this year–you can remove it.  Pick up every single stone and gently smooth the soil to the same level as the lawn.  DO NOT add mulch.  You may put down a very thin layer of ORGANIC LEAF COMPOST, not more than 1/2 an inch.
  • If you don’t know when this happened, remove the rocks and scrape away the extra soil.  BUT DO NOT SCRAPE away roots.  The tree may have tried to grow surface roots into the soil in order to recover health and breathe.  You may put down a very thin layer of ORGANIC LEAF COMPOST, not more than 1/2 an inch.
  • After removing the stones, leave it alone.  DO NOT fertilize as that will put more stress on the tree!
  • Water the tree regularly when it is hot and dry in summer.

You might try something unconventional to help the tree.

  • Give the tree lots of loving attention.  Say nice things to it from your heart.
  • You might sing to it.
  • You might whisper to it with tree Healing Whispers.  Use the free download at this page at our sister site: TreeWhispering.com
  • Thank the tree for its life and for its gifts to you of oxygen and shade. It is a living Being.
Be a TREE PROTECTOR!  Do what is best for the tree. Think like a tree. Come from the tree’s point of view.

Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Suffocated Under Rocks

The tree says, “My roots need to breathe. Please don’t cover my roots with a heavy rock layer. Air can’t get through them. You might think they are pretty, but they hurt me. I might die from this.”

Dr. Jim Conroy, The Tree Whisperer®, explains:

In many housing developments and even in front of the most elegant of estates, people think that covering the base of a tree with something gives a pretty look. However, this is potentially deadly to the tree.

Would you want rocks laying on your feet? Probably not.

Heavy materials on under the base of the tree can suffocate its delicate roots. Roots need air as much as they need soil and water. Trees pull up water and nutrients from the soil through their roots. But, roots can ROT and DIE if they are covered with materials such as stones or heavy mulch. And, they get hot in summer.

Be a TREE PROTECTOR!  Do what is best for the tree. Think like a tree. Come from the tree’s point of view.

Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Don’t Bury Trees – Fill Kills!!

When houses are built or remodeled, construction professionals who should know better will often regrade the land and bury trees.

This poor Oak was buried under at least 2 feet of fill. FILL KILLS!!!!!!

Within a few months, the tree dropped all of its leaves.  The owner–who was heart-broken–dug the tree out as best he could but it was too late.

The tree died because its access to life-giving air for its roots was cut off and the weight of the soil compressed the roots.

BE VIGILANT ABOUT AVOIDING ADDING SOIL AROUND THE BASES OF TREES.  More than 1/2 of an INCH of soil will cut off oxygen and weight down the roots, damaging or killing the tree.  FILL KILLS!!!!!!!!!

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Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Planting in the Wrong Place

All these trees are planted in the wrong place.

The young leafy tree and its companion evergreens are surrounded on 3 sides by the walls of a building.  Their access to sunshine is limited.  They have limited root growth area.

They may survive for a few years, but eventually these conditions will kill them.  In other words, they will need more sunshine, more space for their canopy, and space for their roots than they have.

And, by the way, the soil area is COVERED with stone…a sure way to suffocate the roots.  These poor trees don’t have a chance.

Shade-tolerant smaller bushes or even perennial plants would do better in this place.  And using mulch rather than stones would allow roots to breathe.

 

 

Photos and tips about what NOT to do to trees.

Don’t Litter or Dump Around Trees

Glass. Plastic. Even some paper doesn’t decompose.

It’s common sense.  Don’t do it.